8/25/16

Movie Review of Camp Sawi and Active Vista International Film Festival

Dear Ara Chawdhry and People of Dakila and Camp Sawi:

If you need the song Arci Munoz sang at the end of Camp Sawi movie, then skip reading the article below and head on to the last part where the Youtube video is.

If you want to know how Camp Sawi with Active Vista is suggesting that people seek medical psychological help when they're depressed, read the article.




Active Vista reminds me of how Revolutionizing The Way We See Things can help rape victims see the blessing of their suffering.

And so I used the Active Vista's Truth X Imagination strategy to find genius in Viva Films' movie Camp Sawi, a movie I ignorantly presume to be something that Active Vista contrasts from and a movie that at face value might be labelled as "shallow, superficial or superfluous"

1. Camp Sawi is a comedy your family and friends can watch, with an acting performance and Filipino humor flavor that I believe any Cebuano audience will appreciate, unless they're unhappy.

But it's also an experimental cinema in that it presents us a social experiment of housing people who suffer from an addiction to drama, and steering them away from suicide thru absurd comedy, and the beauty of Cebuano beach the way Gosiengfiao's Temptation Island and Jon Krasinsky's Brief Inteviews with Hideous Men attempted to resolve the knee-jerk reactions of intelligence.

2. Camp Sawi is a comedy that, if you go beyond face value, will make you rethink, and detach from the thought of being victimized.

On the other hand, the movies I saw in Active Vista made me think that maybe the more revolutionary approach is how not to discriminate against movies that are supposedly made for money or movies that are just made for entertainment.

The challenge is for one to not go for the knee-jerk reaction and say things like, "That movie is dumb and is not deep and is not socially relevant."

The challenge is to find in movies like Camp Sawi a form of beauty, and a message that promotes human rights.

The challenge is not to be lured by the dangers, convolutions and pretensions of depth in socially relevant cinema that might have caused David Foster Wallace's and Robin Williams' suicide.

The challenge is to not attach meaning where there is none.

The challenge for Dakila is to find humor in the struggle for change in the same way that Camp Sawi's challenge is for its creators to be aware of the costs of being shallow.

The challenge is for Camp Sawi and Dakila's directors to have Skin In The Game in that they will, say, build a mechanism that if it's proven that the people who have seen their movies will become depressed by watching them, Camp Sawi and Active Vista will help pay for mental health medication because they contributed to the health hazard. Or something like that.

Movies in the Active Vista International Human Rights Film Festival seem to scream of importance in a culture where intellectuals can defend that Cat Videos are just as, if not more important than, a film covering poverty and human rights, especially after reading enough Postmodern Philosophy to see them that way.

The challenge of Active Vista is to accept that The Truth, after reading Nicholas Nassim Taleb, David Foster Wallace and Jessica Zafra's blog, is to embrace cosmic indifference, to remember that we're just teaching birds to fly, and that the reason Filipinos forget too easily is because it's in being in the constant present detached from time can one be happy.

If one can be happy, why would a sane Filipino stick to the past that makes one suffer?

P.S. You can watch the beautifully shot Camp Sawi at SM Seaside City Cinema. You might not have the same wonderful experience if you watch elsewhere.

Also, here's The Arci Song in Camp Sawi you're looking for and that you're playing in a loop a million timesh, probably harming yourself:


Yours,
a bad richard

5 comments:

  1. The lure of "socially relevant cinema" is that it holds a mirror towards society and aims to educate. Why blame socially relevant cinema for Robin Williams suicide? That's a tacky way to name drop and insensitive to the reality of his death. If you generalize these films as only setting up a "pretense of depth", maybe you need to get your head out of the ground. A film is not pretentious just because you're used to the kind that holds your hand through the viewing process. Dili pretentious ang usa ka salida kay abi lang wa ka kasabot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Ara:

      Thank you for the benevolence of your comment. First of all, I'm your fan, even if trailer pako kakita sa imong Miss Bulalacao (the trailer has an air of Wes Anderson's stills, so I'm enthralled). Second, you blew me away with Honor Thy Father, the most chill-giving moving film I've seen in a while. I put credit to you for choosing it in the festival, and anything you choose from now will be of a priority. But first:

      1. I am this guy on Active Vista's comment section, who wrote this:

      Dear Active Film Fest Organizers: I am stunned by Honor Thy Father for its howling beauty! It screams of P.T. Anderson's and Wes Anderson's and Ara Anderson's este Chawdhury's aesthetics/framing. Smooth ang screenplay and after reading the credits nga gikan ni Michiko, I was like, "Ahh, mao diay..." And then my seatmate ran because she was weirded out haha. Also, the composition is so, uhm, composed..said Kurdapya Jones lols. Grabe jud. Most moving film I've seen in a while. Oddly enough, HTF reminds me of Sana Dati and Lav Diaz' Norte and Albert Camus' The Stranger tagalog translation in Jessica Zafra's blog in that the real horror/beauty of it all is the absurd indifference of the universe and the fact that no one's at fault, and yet someone should be responsble. Also, I googled Erik Matti's cinematographer for this after watching so I can binge his movies away and use his style to fashion solutions for Mandaue Traffic. Will blog review it stat here because thankful:


      2. The keyword in my statement regarding Robin Williams's and Cinema is MIGHT, and the context is the universe's uncertainty and randomness and unknowability. To say that I blame cinema for his death is true, but only in about the percentage blame that I can assign to how a sight of a cat drinking milk MIGHT also be Robin Williams' cause of suicide. So it's .000000000001x percent blame. It's not much, but it's not nothing, too. And I agree with you that dili pretentious ang usa ka salida abi lang wa ta kasabot in the same way that dili tacky and dili act of name-dropping and dili insensitive to the reality of Robin Williams death ang pag "blame" sa iyang demise to Socially Relevant cinema just because wala ta kasabot. Or not. Please enlighten me.

      2. And about pretension. Ah, the big P word. That's the word that might have gotten me to clinical depression, straight out from when after I read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in The Rye where Holden champions the "phony" word. My problem with Pretension goes so far deeper than I'd like it to be. To the point where I'm concerned of this: how do I know whether I'm being genuine or I've just mastered all the cues and symbols to being authentic and unpretentious, so people are going to be like, "Wow! This guy is really unpretentious" and then I use that image of me being unpretentious to my favor?

      Also, I don't think I'm generalizing and yet I am generalizing and I accept this contradiction because I can only have so much words to capture the ideas that I have of things, and how much can we know really when there's no certainty of things, Albert Camus' humanity as my context? And I don't know why, but I just think that to embrace the contradiction is more truthful.

      3. I felt stings of upset on my chest after reading your comment and I felt attacked because I probably was in a Knee-Jerk "React Dayon Kay Natarog Imong Ego" mode. But when I let the meaning loose to your comments, I feel the grace of life. And perhaps another level of beauty of Active Vista movies, especially Lucia De B, is that we are more open-armed and embracing of people like me. And so thank you for the embrace.

      Delete
    2. Footnotes/Corrections:

      *let loose the fixed meaning of your comments, and just make it almost formless, using Eckhart Tolle's Formlessness modes in his book Power of Now.

      Delete
  2. You said "The challenge is to not attach meaning where there is none" But you spend 1/3 of your post attaching meaning to camp sawi... That seems extremely hypocritical and contradictory.

    Not to say that there isn't any meaning in that movie, because everything is subjective. It touched you and so has meaning to you. But the same can be said of "socially relevant cinema". There are people that it touches and so it has meaning for them. it's not fair to say that "socially relevant cinema" is dangerous and people are just attaching meaning to it when there is none unless you're willing to see that the same arguments can be applied to what you yourself are doing.

    You don't have to demonize others to defend your argument. In fact doing so only weakens your point.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Ganibear:

      Thank you for not ignoring me.

      1. Yes, it is extremely "hypocritical and contradictory" and it is absurd, and I'm trying to really figure out its reconciliation for years now even to the point of taking antidepressants, but this contradiction is the closest to the truth that I feel, and I don't know why, and the context of this is Albert Camus' Absurdity and/or Soundbite Quotes, where it goes something like this:

      “I think my life is of great importance, but I also think it is meaningless.”
      ― Albert Camus

      And this:

      “The final conclusion of absurdist reasoning is, in fact, the repudiation of suicide and the acceptance of the desperate encounter between human inquiry and the silence of the universe. Suicide would mean the end of this encounter, and absurdist reasoning considers that it could not consent to this without negating its own premises.”
      ― Albert Camus, The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt

      2. I don't think I'm demonizing anyone. In fact, Active Vista Movies have moved me so much they shaped me, but it's not up to me what others think of what I say, because in the worlds of Albert Camus,

      "Men are never convinced of your reasons, of your sincerity, of the seriousness of your sufferings, except by your death. So long as you are alive, your case is doubtful; you have a right only to their skepticism"
      - Albert Camus, The Fall

      3. By the way, here's me showing how much meaningful Active Vista's movies such as Honor Thy Father are to me, and I wrote this on Active Vista's Timeline comments:

      Dear Active Film Fest Organizers: I am stunned by Honor Thy Father for its howling beauty! It screams of P.T. Anderson's and Wes Anderson's and Ara Anderson's este Chawdhury's aesthetics/framing. Smooth ang screenplay and after reading the credits nga gikan ni Michiko, I was like, "Ahh, mao diay..." And then my seatmate ran because she was weirded out haha. Also, the composition is so, uhm, composed..said Kurdapya Jones lols. Grabe jud. Most moving film I've seen in a while. Oddly enough, HTF reminds me of Sana Dati and Lav Diaz' Norte and Albert Camus' The Stranger tagalog translation in Jessica Zafra's blog in that the real horror/beauty of it all is the absurd indifference of the universe and the fact that no one's at fault, and yet someone should be responsble. Also, I googled Erik Matti's cinematographer for this after watching so I can binge his movies away and use his style to fashion solutions for Mandaue Traffic. Will blog review it stat here because thankful:

      Delete

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